kutlis-thenarcissist Obviously criminalizing homeless people is a horrible thing to do. But sadly it’s becoming a trend here in the U.S., and there is at least a couple reasons for it.

One is what the article mentions: the pressure property owners put on local authorities to “clean up the streets” and remove poor people from the area. It effectively gentrifies city centers from even the sight of the destitute.

Unfortunately, these policies have been especially popular with local governments here in Florida. For example, in recent years there’s also been police crackdowns on public feedings of homeless people in Central Florida cities like Orlando and Daytona Beach.

And I wouldn’t be surprised if there’s a connection between the ordinances Fort Lauderdale’s city council passed and the the private, for-profit prison industry here in the U.S.


But [Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro] really won the crowd over [during a speech in the Bronx] as he recalled recent criticisms published in editorials by the Washington Post and the New York Times, the first of which referred to him as an “economically illiterate former bus driver”. “I am proud,” Maduro said emphatically to great applause, “to have been a worker of the Caracas metro, to have been a day-laborer and now be president; I’ll let everyone at the Washington Post know!”“How many [false] things are said daily of Venezuela among mass Western media?” he continued. “How many lies are fabricated in relation to the lives of the noble people of Venezuela, whose only sin was to aspire and dream of a new society, by constructing new socio-economic and political models which surpass capitalism?”“To the Department of State, the Pentagon, the National Communication Association (NCA), to the White House, I ask you now to rectify the erratic political abuse of Venezuela and our revolution, because our revolution will not fall – on the contrary, it is rooted in popular, democratic constitutionality…and we have the reason and the right to continue it.”

(Source)
But [Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro] really won the crowd over [during a speech in the Bronx] as he recalled recent criticisms published in editorials by the Washington Post and the New York Times, the first of which referred to him as an “economically illiterate former bus driver”. 

“I am proud,” Maduro said emphatically to great applause, “to have been a worker of the Caracas metro, to have been a day-laborer and now be president; I’ll let everyone at the Washington Post know!”

“How many [false] things are said daily of Venezuela among mass Western media?” he continued. “How many lies are fabricated in relation to the lives of the noble people of Venezuela, whose only sin was to aspire and dream of a new society, by constructing new socio-economic and political models which surpass capitalism?”

“To the Department of State, the Pentagon, the National Communication Association (NCA), to the White House, I ask you now to rectify the erratic political abuse of Venezuela and our revolution, because our revolution will not fall – on the contrary, it is rooted in popular, democratic constitutionality…and we have the reason and the right to continue it.”

(Source: fuckyeahmarxismleninism)

reuterspictures:

Deadly volcano in Japan
A deadly eruption catches hundreds of hikers unaware in clouds of rock and ash.

reuterspictures:

Deadly volcano in Japan

A deadly eruption catches hundreds of hikers unaware in clouds of rock and ash.

(Source: todoelajo, via basednkrumah)

anarcho-queer:

Florida City Makes It Illegal To Sleep In Public And Ask For Money In Effort To Criminalize Homelessness
A city in Florida already notorious for its treatment of the homeless is going a step further. Last week, the Ft. Lauderdale City Commission unanimously approved two separate measures that restrict basic survival necessities for many homeless people, including sleeping in public areas and asking others for money.

The first, Ordinance No. C-14-41, makes it illegal for anyone to sleep in public in the downtown area. According to commissioners, it was necessary because of Ft. Lauderdale’s interest in the “preservation of property values and the prevention of the deterioration in its downtown.”

(In other words, officials are more concerned about property value than the well-being of homeless people.)
The second measure, Ordinance No. C-14-38, cracks down on people who ask drivers for money at an intersection. Under the new law, panhandling is now illegal at “busy intersections,” which includes dozens of stops in the city. The measure won’t just apply to homeless people, but anyone trying to raise money for charity, including children. Commissioners justified the move by pointing to the fact that there were 154 pedestrians involved in traffic accidents last year. But notably absent from that statistic is how many of those accidents involved panhandlers.
According to the Sun Sentinel, violators of the new laws could face both a $500 fine and 60 days in jail.
Both measures passed by 5-0 votes, despite overwhelming testimony in opposition to the proposals. One local pastor, Craig Watts, cautioned commissioners against “laws that criminalize misfortune.” He called it “ethically dubious at best,” noting that the religious community opposed these measures.
This isn’t the first time that commissioners in Ft. Lauderdale have worked to criminalize homelessness in the city, nor is it even the first time this year. In April, the city passed a measure  making it illegal for homeless people to have possessions in public and empowered police officers to confiscate them, provided they gave the individual 24 hours notice.

anarcho-queer:

Florida City Makes It Illegal To Sleep In Public And Ask For Money In Effort To Criminalize Homelessness

A city in Florida already notorious for its treatment of the homeless is going a step further. Last week, the Ft. Lauderdale City Commission unanimously approved two separate measures that restrict basic survival necessities for many homeless people, including sleeping in public areas and asking others for money.

The first, Ordinance No. C-14-41, makes it illegal for anyone to sleep in public in the downtown area. According to commissioners, it was necessary because of Ft. Lauderdale’s interest in the “preservation of property values and the prevention of the deterioration in its downtown.

(In other words, officials are more concerned about property value than the well-being of homeless people.)

The second measure, Ordinance No. C-14-38, cracks down on people who ask drivers for money at an intersection. Under the new law, panhandling is now illegal at “busy intersections,” which includes dozens of stops in the city. The measure won’t just apply to homeless people, but anyone trying to raise money for charity, including children. Commissioners justified the move by pointing to the fact that there were 154 pedestrians involved in traffic accidents last year. But notably absent from that statistic is how many of those accidents involved panhandlers.

According to the Sun Sentinel, violators of the new laws could face both a $500 fine and 60 days in jail.

Both measures passed by 5-0 votes, despite overwhelming testimony in opposition to the proposals. One local pastor, Craig Watts, cautioned commissioners against “laws that criminalize misfortune.” He called it “ethically dubious at best,” noting that the religious community opposed these measures.

This isn’t the first time that commissioners in Ft. Lauderdale have worked to criminalize homelessness in the city, nor is it even the first time this year. In April, the city passed a measure making it illegal for homeless people to have possessions in public and empowered police officers to confiscate them, provided they gave the individual 24 hours notice.

(via sixsahbee)

saintkyril said: So what have you been up to these days? I've been really busy with life (working at Papa John's trying to make money and whatnot and working on some game projects).

Well, a lot has happened the last couple of months. I’m going to make a video sometime next week and publicly announce my future plans. It’s big enough news that I don’t want to randomly post about it in an ask…lol. So stay tuned.

And what game projects are you working on? Didn’t know you worked on that type of stuff.

I’m open to any questions you all have tonight. Please send them to my ask box.

la-xingada:

White Professor: was slavery abolished?

me: well, slavery is still legal for the incarcerated

Professor: *laughs* no… anyone try to tell you slavery is legal.. its very wrong.. don’t believe people

me: what I mean is the thirteenth amendment outlawed slavery except for people convicted of a crime

professor: *keeps laughing* *class keeps laughing*, no that is outrageous why would we let slavery continue? that is very wrong..

me: *walks out of class and drops the class*

Amendment XIII (of the U.S. Constitution)

Section 1.

Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.

Section 2.

Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

(Source)

instagram:

Visiting the Vibrant, Colorful Cityscape Of Willemstad, Curaçao

For more vivid landscapes and architecture from the island of Curaçao, explore the Willemstad location page.

One of the first things visitors notice about Willemstad, the capitol of Curaçao, is its brightly colored houses. The Dutch-influenced architecture reflects the colonial history of the tiny island nation, located in the Caribbean Sea off the coast of Venezuela.

“The landscape and the people who live in this city are as diverse as they come,” says Gaby Lieuw (@sandandstilettos), who grew up in Curaçao and currently runs a travel service for tourists to the island. “Many people speak at least four languages fluently—Dutch, English, Spanish and the local language of Papiamento—and switch between them effortlessly throughout the day.”

According to Gaby, large music festivals are a defining feature of Willemstad, ranging from traditional tumba music to Bruno Mars. But one of the most memorable events that takes over the city center is Curaçao Pride, a celebration of LGBT community which runs from September 24 to 28. Visitors flock to Willemstad from all over the world to participate.

“Pride events on the island are getting bigger and better every year,” says Gaby. “Curaçaoans always know how to throw a good party.”

(Source: sustainableprosperity, via fuckyeahmarxismleninism)