Hogwarts. Universal Orlando. August 28, 2014.

Hogwarts. Universal Orlando. August 28, 2014.

Le Joli Mai (1963)- A Student from Dahomey

To all of my leftist and anti-imperialist followers, take a few minutes to check out this interview from Chris Marker’s & Pierre Lhomme’s 1963 documentary Le Joli Mai, filmed in May 1962.

I saw the restored version of this movie on TV tonight with improved English subtitles. So the translation is a little rough in this older version, but the gist of it is still there. (You’ll probably need to make the video full-screen to see the subtitles since it looks like it’s cutting off the subs on the embedded video above).

ourfeelingofnaturalhigh:

Le Joli Mai (Chris Marker, 1963)

ourfeelingofnaturalhigh:

Le Joli Mai (Chris Marker, 1963)

ommid-e-azadi:

What the actual hell

(via omidvaar)

Can someone please give me some good recommendations for books on Chinese history, or just books about China in general? Also, are there any good books by Chinese authors that I should read?

And/or can someone recommend any good Chinese movies and TV shows?

I’m searching around on the internet for books & movies at the moment, but it’s hard to tell what’s worth reading/watching sometimes.

You can reply in my ask box. Thanks.

My first passport came in the mail today. (8

My first passport came in the mail today. (8

Tags: personal

Y el sol brilla en mis ojos. (And the sun shines into my eyes). Universal Studios Orlando. August 28, 2014.

Y el sol brilla en mis ojos. (And the sun shines into my eyes). Universal Studios Orlando. August 28, 2014.

Me at Krustyland. Universal Studios Orlando. August 28, 2014.

Me at Krustyland. Universal Studios Orlando. August 28, 2014.

Venezuela: Maduro in Chávez’s Shoes
A politically refined reading on the presidency of Nicolás Maduro starting with a recognition of the morass of circumstances he has had to face as the country’s leader.
Written by Franco Vielma, Translated by Danica Jorden. August 27, 2014.
To begin with, and with no desire to rain on a flood, Maduro took the place of someone who possessed an absolute leadership previously unknown throughout the country’s political history. Without seeking it, he put himself in Chávez’s shoes, as Chávez himself was the one to put him in that role. That circumstance already implies a comparison with Chávez, and politically implies understanding the national dynamic between the ambiguity and confusion in the great vacuum left by the Comandante.
On the other hand, there is the well-known circumstance of specific attacks on the economy and destabilization of the country, guarimba barricades, threats of sanctions, and constant international attacks. Maduro has been on the receiving end of an absurd amount of internal attacks by Chavismo factions (the same four opinionated critics who used to attack Chávez so much) who have contributed a great deal to the ultraright’s script, debilitating  Maduro’s image and eviscerating Chavismo. Maduro’s situation is complex, as it would be for anyone who assumed the role of conducting the Chavismo Revolution without the physical presence of Chávez.
Without a doubt, the legacy of Maduro’s recent but extremely turbulent presidency is based on constructing a leadership with its own characteristics: its own attributes, its own styles, its own errors, its own incongruities, in a context of structures, as well as new circumstances. But there is something we must not ignore about what Maduro has in fact done: his emphasis on maintaining the political connection identifying Chávez’s work, and this in spite of the contradictions, as even Chávez himself had them. The sociopolitical outcome of Maduro’s leadership can be appreciated by basically examining the sensitive elements of issues that Chávez never dealt with or did inconsistently, correcting Chávez’s mistakes, elaborating on what Chávez did or continuing what Chávez left unfinished….
(Read more)

Venezuela: Maduro in Chávez’s Shoes

A politically refined reading on the presidency of Nicolás Maduro starting with a recognition of the morass of circumstances he has had to face as the country’s leader.

Written by Franco Vielma, Translated by Danica Jorden. August 27, 2014.

To begin with, and with no desire to rain on a flood, Maduro took the place of someone who possessed an absolute leadership previously unknown throughout the country’s political history. Without seeking it, he put himself in Chávez’s shoes, as Chávez himself was the one to put him in that role. That circumstance already implies a comparison with Chávez, and politically implies understanding the national dynamic between the ambiguity and confusion in the great vacuum left by the Comandante.

On the other hand, there is the well-known circumstance of specific attacks on the economy and destabilization of the country, guarimba barricades, threats of sanctions, and constant international attacks. Maduro has been on the receiving end of an absurd amount of internal attacks by Chavismo factions (the same four opinionated critics who used to attack Chávez so much) who have contributed a great deal to the ultraright’s script, debilitating  Maduro’s image and eviscerating Chavismo. Maduro’s situation is complex, as it would be for anyone who assumed the role of conducting the Chavismo Revolution without the physical presence of Chávez.

Without a doubt, the legacy of Maduro’s recent but extremely turbulent presidency is based on constructing a leadership with its own characteristics: its own attributes, its own styles, its own errors, its own incongruities, in a context of structures, as well as new circumstances. But there is something we must not ignore about what Maduro has in fact done: his emphasis on maintaining the political connection identifying Chávez’s work, and this in spite of the contradictions, as even Chávez himself had them. The sociopolitical outcome of Maduro’s leadership can be appreciated by basically examining the sensitive elements of issues that Chávez never dealt with or did inconsistently, correcting Chávez’s mistakes, elaborating on what Chávez did or continuing what Chávez left unfinished….

(Read more)

Iran in the 80s – a glimpse of a forbidden place

German photographer Casey Hugelfink had access to the Islamic republic in the dark decade after the 1979 revolution, throughout the Iran-Iraq war, when the country was sealed off to reporters and most of the world. She captured these scenes of everyday life with a 35mm Olympus OM and processed them more recently with the Camera+ app on iPhone

(See more pictures here)